Play a C major arpeggio in 1st position

C major chord in 1st position
C major chord in 1st position

Left Hand: Experiment with the amount of pressure being conveyed by your fingers. See just how little pressure is necessary to let the note sound.

Notes for Teachers

Look for tension in the neck, back, legs.

  • Bar 2 makes a good solfeggio exercise: Doh - mi - soh - DOH - mi - soh
  • 6/8 is a useful time signature fior beginners because the swaying rhythm is easier to grasp and less "intellectual" than counting 4/4. The act of swaying with arms over the head or swinging freely, involves large groups of muscles and helps develop the "muscular" memory of rhythm which is the essential basis of good music making.
  • By memorising the 2nd bar of the C, F and G keys and playing them in sequence, the student has learnt the Tonic, Subdominant and Dominant chords in C Major.

Right Hand: The right hand creates a swaying rhythm, gently rippling up and down the 4 notes of the chord. The pattern is repeated as until it is comfortable.

C major arpeggio - Right hand - playing with the thumb only
C major arpeggio - Right hand - playing with the thumb only

  • Aim to evoke the feeling of swaying.
  • Play softly.

When comfortable, switch to this fingering:

C major arpeggio - Right Hand - p i m a fingering
C major arpeggio - right Hand - p i m a fingering

  • The right hand fingers activate the strings in a gentle rippling motion.
  • Feel the "springiness" of the string
  • Set the sound in motion with the barest minimum of energy.
  • When coordination is working well, the fingertips will have a distinctly "live" and tingling feeling.
  • You will become acutely aware of the resistance of each string, it's quite an enjoyable sensation.
  • Pay particular attention to the start of each sound.