Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.

Explore the subtle effects of light on water as you paint one of the most popular of Monet's famous Water Lily series.

About this session

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.

Monet: Nymphae (Waterlilies) 1906, No.1 - video

In the latter period of his life Monet settled on an estate at Giverny. He designed a garden with oriental motifs, flower beds and lily ponds that showcased the colours and textures of flowers.

Monet's Water Lilies (Fr. Nymphae) ran to over 250 paintings. They are very relaxing to paint, and offer a lot of scope for playing with colour and texture.

What will we learn in this painting?

  • Glazing: we use multiple glazes to help create the impression of water
  • Impasto & adding texture to impasto paint by using delicate brushwork
  • Pallete knife: we learn the very delicate use of a palette knife
  • Scumbling: broken paint
  • Painting water: some of the various ways Monet portrayed water
  • Painting water lilies (nymphae)

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Learn the principles of composition employed by Monet, which draw on classical principles, Cezanne and his relationship with music and movement.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
See how daVinci's discoveries in perspective mesh with Cezanne's theories of fundamental shapes.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Learn how to apply Chevreul's colour theory, as was practiced by Monet.

... and much more!

Tone

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Unusually, we tone the canvas in neither warm nor cool grey, but rather in a Cerulean blue based turquoise. At this point we glaze.

Blocking

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
We then block in the greens.

Texture

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
With loose, gestural brushwork we map in the main colours and textures.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
More textures.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Our palette.

Detail

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Details are added with the loose brushwork characteristic of Monet's waterlilies.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Flowers are added with the most delicate touch of impasto.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Impasto is used to build up slightly opaque layers suggesting moving water.

The result

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
The final resiult. This 450 x 600 and framed in the Inglis Baroque style - this being the style most used by Monet.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.

Iterative learning

"Iteration is the repetition of a process in order to generate a sequence of outcomes. The sequence will approach some end point or end value. Each repetition of the process is a single iteration, and the outcome of each iteration is then the starting point of the next iteration." - WIkipedia.

Here are some of my iterations of this Monet. Each time I paint it, I adjust a variable - colour, shape, texture, even extending the painting across two canvases! I have painted this work about 8 times.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.
The first version I painted was very close in dimensions to the original (sold).

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.
In this version I extended the Monet over two canvases - we call this a diptych.

Detail from Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.

Detail from Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - a hand painted interpretation by Sydney based artist Peter Inglis.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Here I emphasised the movement in the water.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. \\o// Paint this in just one session at Inglis Academy - www.inglisacademy.com.
Introducing a more playful palette.

Resources

Student Paintings

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
After 2 glazes, adding impasto with a palette knife.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Using a brush to add texture and a " painterly look " to thick paint.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Adding impasto scumbles with a palette knife.
At this point the student has to work through their initial response of " this looks terrible! "... and have some faith in the process.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
A final painting by Jessica. Now, in context and with further work, the scumbled textures look very convincing.
Note that photography struggles to capture what we see with our eye in natural light.

Monet: Waterlilies, 1906, No.1. - Student painting from Inglis Academy.
Cherry's painting. This one has many delicate brush strokes. Once again the photograph can't capture the wonderful subtle shadows created by the thick paint textures.
Nor can it capture the wonderful depth we achieved by adding two separate layers of glaze during this painting.

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